Ideas have consequences

Ideas have consequences

Before we get into what to do with ideas and viewpoints, we have to establish a foundation of what those are and how they affect the world around us.

First of all, let’s define worldview. If I were to ask one of you “What is a worldview?” chances are I’d get at least one smart-aleck who would answer, “It’s a view of the world.” And of course, they would be right. (Don’t you just hate when smart-alecks actually have the right answer?) But let’s get a little more specific.

According to John Stonestreet, a leader in apologetics and worldview, a worldview is “the framework of basic beliefs we have (whether we know it or not) that shapes our view of and for the world.”

The important thing to notice here is that worldview is twofold. It shapes two different aspects of our life: Our view of the world and our view for the world.

First, our worldview is descriptive of reality. It’s a mental image of what is real. It’s our perspective. When a small boy looks at his parent, the parent seems like a giant. From the child’s frame of reference–he had to tilt his head back really far to see the parent’s face–the parent is huge. However, the parent doesn’t feel like a giant. From the parent’s perspective, there are several other adults his size or even taller. Is the child wrong? Is the parent wrong? Well, there’s a dilemma called relativism. We’ll come back to that in an upcoming post, so keep an eye out!

Second, our worldview is our view for the world–it is prescriptive for how we live. If we perceive someone as easily angered, we will adjust our behavior to avoid setting them off. If we view people as out to get us, we will be suspicious of every action they take towards us, even if it seems good. If we consider people to be nothing more than the product of evolution, having come about by random processes, we have no reason to treat them well. See where this leads?

G.K. Chesterton once said, “A man can no more possess a private religion than he can possess a private sun and moon.” As the sun and moon affect the lives of every creature on the planet, religion–or, worldview–affects every aspect of a person’s life and others’ lives as well. It’s absolutely crucial to realize that people’s ideas about the world aren’t just harmless opinions. Ideas have consequences.

The 20th century was a huge example of just how big the consequences of ideas can be. At the beginning of the century, optimism was high. Humankind had been “enlightened” by science, and science was going to fix everything. It was clear that God had no place in either the beginning of the world or the sustenance of it. Evolution was king, and the best way to fix all the world’s problems was to help natural selection out by getting rid of the weak and others unfit for survival.

We all know how the rest of the story goes. The rise of Hitler’s Nazi Germany and Stalin’s communist Russia caused the fall of millions upon millions of human beings. At the end of both regimes, an estimated 120 million people had lost their lives as a direct result of the ideas of Hitler and Karl Marx (the creator of communism). Far from utopia, the 20th century was a bloodbath of devastating proportions. Clearly, it matters which ideas and which worldview you possess. It’s not a question of sincerity. Hitler was plenty sincere. He was an incredibly dedicated man. But he was whole-heartedly dedicated to the wrong thing.

Here’s a thought: You can tell a lot about what someone thinks is the problem by what they offer as the solution. Marx thought the problem with the world was the separation of classes in society, so he thought that eliminating the economic differences between people would solve all the conflict. Instead, it resulted in the great oppression and poverty of the masses, while the ruling elite lived like pigs. However, if the problem with the world is each individual’s sin, it makes sense that the problem can only be solved by the taking away of the sin of the world and changed lives.

A person’s worldview is made up of answers to five big questions about reality:

  1. Origin–Where did we all come from?
  2. Identity–What is a human being? What makes them who they are?
  3. Meaning–What is the purpose in our existence? What’s the point?
  4. Morality–What is right and wrong, and how do we know that? Or, what’s wrong with the world?
  5. Destiny–Where is history headed?

How you answer one question affects how you answer another. If, for instance, you answer the origin question by saying we all evolved from bacteria, our identity then lies in our random genetic makeup, our existence is meaningless, and there is no standard for right and wrong. Do you see how these follow each other? Ideas don’t exist by themselves. That’s why they have consequences. Ideas interlock and change how we view and explain the world and how we react to it. Everyone has a worldview, whether they realize it or not.

Society wants to say that each person is entitled to believe what he or she wants, but that those beliefs are private and have nothing to do with the “real world.” Religion has no place in the political sphere, they say. And yet, everyone has a worldview, and that worldview affects their decisions within the public realm. That is why it’s so important to analyze both your own worldview and others’–because ideas, manifesting themselves in actions, change the world.

 

What are some ideas you hold about the world? What are your answers to the five “big questions,” and can you see how they tie in with each other and influence actions in your life?

If all we give them is a ‘heart’ religion, it will not be strong enough to counter the lure of attractive but dangerous ideas. Young believers also need a ‘brain’ religion–training in worldview and apologetics–to equip them to analyze and critique the competing worldviews they will encounter when they leave home.” — Nancy Pearcey 

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